Can yoga help with lower back pain? Print

 

Back pain is one the most common conditions in the UK and causes millions of people pain.  A recent medical review suggests that yoga may help relieve the discomfort of pain in the lower pack. The review stated that in some people there is evidence that yoga may help relieve pain and improve function associated with chronic lower back pain.  A chronic condition is something that cannot be cured but managed with ongoing treatments etc.

The study looked at 12 trials that compared the effects of yoga with other treatments, such as physiotherapy, or no treatment at all.

Yoga benefitted people with lower back pain compared with those who did do any exercise for their back.

If someone was already doing exercise then the results were not as compelling.

 

Yoga is a usually slow-paced exercise routine which integrates various positions with

The researchers did say the results should be treated with a little caution as it was not possible to hide the effects of the yoga from the participants so a placebo effect could have come into play.

 

There are currently quite a few recommended treatments for long-term back pain, including painkillers, physiotherapy, exercise or cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). If you suffer from back pain you should talk to your doctor.

 

It is very important to keep active and mobile as much as possible. When it comes to lower back pain yoga could be one of a range of possibly beneficial exercise-based treatments for back pain.  It is worth investigating to find the right treatments for you.

 

Three universities carried out the research in the UK, US and Yoga Sangeeta in the US.

The UK researchers were much more enthusiastic than the US based Cochrane researchers, who are known to err on the side of caution.

The researchers stated "There is low- to moderate-certainty evidence that yoga compared to non-exercise controls results in small to moderate improvements in back-related function at three and six months. Yoga may also be slightly more effective for pain at three and six months."

They added: "It is uncertain whether there is any difference between yoga and other exercise for back-related function or pain, or whether yoga added to exercise is more effective than exercise alone.”

"Yoga is associated with more adverse events than non-exercise controls, but may have the same risk of adverse events as other back-focused exercise. Yoga is not associated with serious adverse events."

 

You can find out more about yoga here

 

Also:


Yoga Alliance

 

The British Wheel of Yoga

 

Independent Yoga Network

 

Iyengar Yoga