Online Shopping Customer Service 0300 3033380*
Home
Vitamin A, C, D, E

Shopping Cart

Health Advice
Main Menu
Newsletter

Name:

Email:

Vitamin A, C, D, E

 

Vitamin A
What it does

This fat-soluble nutrient is stored in the liver. Part of our vitamin A is made from beta-carotene, found in fruit and vegetables. The rest is absorbed from animal fats. Vitamin A prevents night blindness, keeps the skin in good condition, maintains the respiratory and digestive systems and helps build strong teeth and bones. It's also essential for a healthy immune system that's able to fight infections such as colds and flu. Animal studies suggest it can help prevent breast, lung and skin cancer. Because it promotes healing a form of this vitamin is used to treat acne, psoriasis and severely sun-damaged skin.


How to spot a deficiency

Although rare in this country, too little vitamin A can affect the eyes and cause conditions such as night blindness. Dry or spotty skin may also mean you're not getting enough of this vitamin.


Image


Food Sources

It's almost impossible to get too much vitamin A from your diet unless you're eating fish or liver every day, so boost your intake by eating plenty of different coloured vegetables that contain beta-carotene for the body to turn into vitamin A.


Supplements

Too much vitamin A can be toxic and can damage the developing foetus if you're pregnant. Signs that you're getting too much include cracking skin, hair loss, bleeding gums, fatigue, nausea and irritability. If you want to increase your vitamin A intake safely, take a beta-carotene supplement. Your body will only convert as much as it needs into vitamin A.
Vitamin C
Active Image
What it does

Probably the best known vitamin, C has many functions in the body. In particular it's known to protect cells and fight damage from 'free radicals'. C also helps strengthen capillaries, prevent bruising and keeps gums strong and healthy.


How to spot a deficiency

Having too little vitamin C is linked with heart disease, an increase in colds and flu and cataracts. It also caused scurvy, the debilitating disease that was common amongst sailors in the past .

Food Sources

The best source of vitamin C is citrus fruits. Other foods high in this nutrient are broccoli, dark-green leafy vegetables, red peppers and strawberries.

Supplements

Many nutritionists recommend that everyone takes a vitamin C supplement on a daily basis. For general good health 200mg is adequate, but if treating a particular condition 1000mg is more effective. It should be taken with meals to aid absorption. Do not exceed 2000mg per day as this can cause diarrhoea.
Vitamin D
What it does

Vitamin D is produced in the body when our skin is exposed to sunlight. Because it's basic function is to regulate the blood levels of calcium, it's essential for healthy bones and teeth.

How to spot a deficiency

There was no official recommended daily intake of vitamin D as it was felt our bodies made enough from the sun. However it's now understood that as we age the body's ability to make vitamin D declines. This means that older people are more inclined to have a deficiency. Despite this, research has found that many people have low stores of this vitamin. A deficiency can harm the bones causing rickets in children and making adults more likely to develop the bone thinning disease osteoporosis. It also causes diarrhoea, headaches, weight loss and nausea.
Active Image


Food Sources

Oily fish such as pilchards, mackerel and tuna are rich in vitamin D and it's added to many breakfast cereals.


Supplements

People over 50 who don't go outside for at least 15 minutes each day are recommended to take 10-15mcg of vitamin D per day.
Vitamin E
Active Image
What it does

This crucial vitamin has massive disease-fighting potential as an 'antioxidant' that prevents cell damage. This means it may offer protection against heart disease, cancer and premature ageing. It has also been found to help aid the healing of skin wounds and scarring.

How to spot a deficiency

Very low levels of vitamin E can cause neurological damage, but eating a balanced diet should ensure this isn't a problem.

Food Sources

The best sources of vitamin E are vegetable oils, wheatgerm, nuts and seeds, green-leafy vegetables and wholegrains.

Supplements

To get the full antioxidant benefit of vitamin E you would need to take a supplement of at least 250mg. Taking it with food will aid it’s absorption.


[Back]